Bloodshot Movie Review : A thrilling leap of sci-fi imagination



Critic's Rating: 
3.5/5
STORY: Following his gruesome assassination, elite soldier Ray Garrison (Vin Diesel) is resurrected by scientists using nanotechnology. But does his new life belong to him?


vumoo REVIEW: With an indestructible body and brute strength, the slain US Marine Ray Garrison is revived as ‘Bloodshot’ - a biotech killing machine like no other. Dr. Emil Harting (Guy Pearce) breathes new life into Garrison’s body but robs him of all the memories of his past life. A life that is cut short by a psycho killer, who kills Ray’s wife Gina Garrison (Talulah Riley) in cold blood, before killing him too.
Based on the Valiant Comics character with the same name, ‘Bloodshot’ sets off with a solid premise for a revenge drama. Add to that, a wholesome dose of sci-fi tropes, give the narrative a thrilling leap of imagination. Like the microscopic ‘nanites’ running in Ray’s bloodstream that can magically heal fatal injuries and give him unbridled power. Within seconds, he can download and learn manuals to fly an aircraft just as easily as he can punch down concrete pillars.
Dr Harting’s other team members are also equipped with cutting-edge bionic gear that give them extraordinary abilities. It is exciting to watch the various superpower like abilities of these characters unfold and also be pit against each other.


Vin Diesel plays the part of a revenge-thirsty killer aka Bloodshot with his trademark broodiness and immense machismo. But there is little novelty in his performance. Among the rest, Eiza González as Katie adds a dash of glamour and warmth in the otherwise male-dominated setup. Her character is more humane compared to the other biotech-enhanced superhumans and she is convincing in her role.


The film’s plot unravels swiftly with twists that are somewhat easy to guess. Parts of the narrative will remind you of films like ‘Robocop’ and ‘Wolverine’, but there are a few loose ends that create confusion. Also, due to the constant hoodwinking between truth and conspiracy, it’s hard to tell how much of it is happening for real.
The computer graphics and visual effects showing the bionic smarts look real, but the same cannot be said for some of the set pieces. Action, for the most part, is quite edge of the seat, especially, the one in the elevator.
Overall, ‘Bloodshot’ is a decent attempt that scores on its ambitious sci-fi imagination and a superhero, who is always ready for action.