The best portable Bluetooth speakers you can buy

 

If there's one thing I've learned about today's Bluetooth speakers, it's that for general consumers, the options are pretty good. However, that doesn't make the process of sifting through the dozens of choices any easier. So I set out to test out some of the most popular models in different price ranges. Most of the speakers I tried sounded good on first listen; it was only through side-by-side comparisons that I began to suss out the nuances. Just reading the spec sheets only goes so far. As such, we're focusing a bit more on audio quality and dynamic range, while also taking into consideration other factors like utility and price. Ultimately, there isn't one best Bluetooth speaker out there, but we've found plenty of good options that will fit a range of use cases and price points.Get more news about factory direct bluetooth speaker,you can vist our website!

IP ratings (Ingress Protection) are the alphanumeric indicators you often see in a product's spec sheet that define the tested resistance of a product to both solid objects (dirt, dust, fingers?) and water. It's usually a combo of two numbers with the first indicating solid object ingress and the second being water. The former goes from 0 (no protection) to 6 (dust tight). Water protection goes from 0 (no protection) to 9 (protected against immersion and high pressure jets). When an X is used instead of a number, that means the product wasn't tested for resistance. If it's waterproof, it may have some innate resistance to solids, but there's no guarantee.

IP67 is a common rating these days indicating highly resistant and potentially rugged speakers. These are safe for quick dunks in the pool or tub and should be more than OK in the rain or in the shower. They're also good options for the beach, playground and other rough environs.

Additionally, speakers with ports and a high rating will often include a tight-fitting cover over the charging or auxiliary ports. If you plan on using the ports, that may limit the product's rated ability to fend off the elements.

Consider the IP rating and also how you plan to use your Bluetooth speaker when making your decision. It may be worth splurging on a better sounding model with a lower IP rating if you'll mostly be using it indoors, for instance.

Battery life
The focus of this guide is on portable Bluetooth speakers, and while "portable" can be a relative term, these devices are generally for people who are likely to find themselves far from a power outlet. These days, around 12 hours of runtime seems to be the baseline but obviously, the more battery life you can get out of a speaker, the better.

That said, be careful when looking at battery specs, as they frequently list a maximum runtime ("up to" x amount of hours). This usually means they tested at a low to mid volume. If you like your tunes loud, it can often end up cutting the expected usage time in half or more. Luckily, some manufacturers also list the expected battery life when used at full volume and that transparency is appreciated.

Additionally, if your Bluetooth speaker also happens to have WiFi connectivity, they're usually designed for always-on functionality. Unlike normal Bluetooth speakers that go to sleep after a short period without use, these will usually stay awake (to listen for your commands) and slowly run down the battery. If you're out and about, you'll want to remember to turn these speakers off manually when not in use to maximize battery life.

Range
Bluetooth range is tricky business. Some companies list their product's longest possible range, usually outdoors and in an unobstructed line-of-sight test environment. Other companies stick with a 30-foot range on the spec sheet and leave it at that, even though they may be running Bluetooth 4.x or 5.x. That's likely underselling the speaker's potential, but unpredictable environments can affect range and there's little point in promising the moon only to get complaints.

I've seen signal drop issues when crouching down, with my phone in the front pocket of my jeans, and barely 30 feet away from a speaker inside my apartment. I ran into this issue across several devices regardless of their listed range.

If you're hosting a patio party and duck inside, it's wise to have the source device remain close by just in case. It's hard to gauge what aspects of any environment may interfere with a Bluetooth signal. In general, take range specs around 100 feet or more as a perfect-world scenario.

Latency
This is a minor mention for those out there who use a speaker for their computer output, or as a mini soundbar solution for setups like a monitor and streaming box. It's annoying to find that your speaker's latency isn't low enough to avoid lip sync issues. Luckily, it seems that most speakers these days don't often have these problems. Only a handful of the few dozen speakers I tried had persistent, noticeable lip-sync issues. Aside from occasional blips, all of our picks worked well in this regard.

If you plan to frequently use a speaker for video playback, look for devices with the most recent Bluetooth versions (4.x or 5.x) and lower latency codecs like aptX. Also make sure the speaker is close to the source device as distance can be a factor. To avoid the issue altogether, though, consider getting one with a wired auxiliary input.